Simple Present Tense: The two main essential functions of Simple present Tense are to state the action which is happening right now and to state the action which happens regularly or unceasingly(that is why Simple Present is sometimes also called as Present Indefinite Tense). So, In this article, we will know more about Simple Present Tense.

What is Simple Present Tense?

The definition given by Cambridge Dictionary is, “The simple present tense is used to refer to events, actions, and conditions that are happening all the time, or exist now.” When the verb defines/denotes an activity that is going on in the present time or is a regular event, then the verb is used in the Simple/Indefinite Present Tense form.

Structure of Simple Present Tense

                                                                            Structure of Simple/Indefinite Present Tense
TypeFormula & RulesExamples
Simple Present TenseSubject + Verb in the base form(V1)+ -s/es (if singular) + the rest of the sentenceRimmy plays in the park

Examples of Simple Present Tense

  • Ramesh eats bread and butter before going to school.
  • Alisa watches cartoons every day.
  • Roopam drinks milk every night before going to bed.
  • Juhi goes to the gym daily.
  • Dipali smokes.
  • Shilpi reads the newspaper every day.

Structure of Sentences in Simple Present Tense

Simple/Indefinite Present Tense sentences can be in three forms, that is, Positive or Affirmative, Negative, Interrogative sentences. Below is the structure of all three forms and examples to make you understand better.

Affirmative/Positive Sentence Structure:

Structure of Affirmative/Positive Sentences
Subject + Verb in the base form(V1)+ -s/es (if singular) + the rest of the sentence

Examples of Affirmative/Positive Sentences:

  • He writes letter
  • Radhika gets up everyday at 6 am
  • She dances well.

Negative Sentence Structure:

Structure of Negative Sentence
Subject + do/does not+ Verb(V1)+ rest of the sentence

Examples of Negative Sentences:

  • The Sun does not set in the east.
  • All the cars do not stop at this crossing.
  • Meena does not teach social studies in a school.

Interrogative Sentence Structure:

Structure of Interrogative Sentence
Do/does + Subject + Verb(V1) + rest of the sentences?

Examples of Interrogative Sentence: 

  • Does the sun set in the east?
  • Do all the a cars stop at this crossing?
  • Does Meena teach social studies in a school?

Uses of Simple Present Tense

Some of the uses of Simple Present Tense are-

1. To express a habitual action,

2. To express a general truth,

3. In exclamatory sentences beginning with here and there to express what is actually taking place in the present,

4. In a vivid narrative, as a substitute for Simple Past,

5. To express a future event that is part of a fixed timetable or fixed programs.

In addition to these uses, some of the other uses are-

1. It is used to introduce quotations,

2. It is used instead of the Simple Future Tense, in the clause of time and of condition.

3. As in broadcast commentaries on sporting events, the simple present is used. 

Examples of Uses of Simple Present Tense

1. To Express a habitual action:

  • He drinks tea every morning.
  • I get up everyday at five o'clock.
  • My watch keeps good time.

2. To Express General Truth:

  • The sun rises in the east.
  • Honey is Sweet.
  • Fortune favors the brave

3. In Exclamatory sentences beginning with here and there to express what is actually taking place in the present:

  • Here comes the bus !
  • There she goes !

4. In vivid narrative, as substitute for the Simple Past:

  • Sohrab now rushes forward and deals a heavy blow to Rustam.
  • Immediately the Sultan hurries to his capital.

5. To express a future event that is part of a fixed time table or fixed programme:

  • The next flight is at 7.00 tomorrow morning.
  • The match starts at 9 o'clock.
  • The train leaves at 5.20.
  • When does the coffee house reopen?

In addition to these uses they are used,

1. It is used to introduce quotations:

  • Keats says, “ A thing of beauty is a joy for ever".

2. It is used, instead of the Simple Future Tense , in clauses of time and of condition:

  • I shall wait till you finish your lunch.
  • If it rains we shall get .
Related Links
Present TenseTense Chart
Present Perfect TensePresent Continuous Tense
Present Perfect Continuous Tense
Simple Present Tense- FAQs

Ans. The definition given by Cambridge Dictionary is, “The simple present tense is used to refer to events, actions, and conditions that are happening all the time, or exist now.” When the verb defines/denotes an activity that is going on in the present time or is a regular event, then the verb is used in the simple present tense form.

Ans. The rule for Simple Present Tense is, Subject + Verb in the base form/third person plural form + the rest of the sentence. For eg. Alisa watches cartoons every day.

Ans. Some of the examples are, Ramesh eats bread and butter before going to school, Alisa watches cartoons every day. Roopam drinks milk every night before going to bed, Juhi goes to the gym daily, Dipali smokes, Shilpi reads the newspaper every day.

Ans. Uses of Simple Present Tense are: To express a habitual action, To express a general truth, In exclamatory sentences beginning with here and there to express what is actually taking place in the present, In a vivid narrative, as a substitute for Simple Past, To express a future event that is part of a fixed timetable or fixed programs.

Ans. The two rules which are followed in the simple present tense are that verb should appear in the base form and the verb should be used in the plural.

Ans. No, there is no difference between Simple present Tense and Indefinite Present Tense, both are same. There are two main essential functions of Simple present Tense, that is, to state the action which is happening right now and to state the action which happens regularly or unceasingly(that is why Simple Present is sometimes also called as Present Indefinite Tense).

Important Links